FOOD! Helpful information, meal plans, recipes…..

FOOD!

Over the years I have been in charge of more than a few different S.C.A. Lunches and Breakfasts in New Zealand, Australia, Ireland and England, and a few Metal Weapon and S.C.A. evening feasts and soup kitchens.

It is always a scary embarkation cooking for an event for the first time, regardless of the amount of people. Starting by offering to do a breakfast and then progressing to a soup kitchen or lunch can often ease you into things if you are wanting to start,  but are still that little bit intimidated.

It may sound obvious, but talking to someone in your area that cooks regularly to help you with quantities etc, and making notes of these is really helpful as a resource.

Volunteering and being in someone else’s kitchen also gives you an idea of what takes a while to cook, how things are made, and also what you might like to try to cook in the future.

Below are a few of the Recipes, Run sheets and Meal Plans that I have used over the years. 

Lunch and Breakfast are generally easier and appreciated by all if they are simple.  Lunch for 120 people (Canterbury Faire) or 250 people (Great Northern War) when it is catering to a range of diets etc and they are waiting in a queue usually means simple is best and faster when serving.

However, with simple I try to add variety.  If cooking lunch over a few days at an event, varying the soup etc each day, and using the left overs from the feast the night before is a good thing. It just means it isn’t the same thing 3 days in a row.

A TYPICAL S.C.A. Cresent Isles BREAKFAST:

Most breakfast prep you need to start 2 Hours before service.

A Minimum of 3 people is good to have. This means some can be chopping mushrooms straight away, while others are laying bacon, and others are cracking eggs.

MENU:

SCRAMBLED EGGS (without salt or milk)
BACON
MUSHROOMS
PORRIDGE (with water not milk)
HONEY
CREAM
BROWN SUGAR

BREAD / TOAST
BUTTER
JAM

SALT
PEPPER

TEA
COFFEE
SUGAR
MILK

SCRAMBLED EGGS:

I do mine without salt or milk for those with dietary issues, it works just as well and you don’t need cream or milk.

Salt can be put out with it, and the secret is to either start early with A LOT of eggs and keep stirring in a big but flat pot, or do lots of small batches and keep them warm as you go.

Break the eggs and then pierce the yolks in the bowl as you go, and do it before you start whisking. You may be lulled into thinking that whisking the eggs will break all the yolks, but 20 odd eggs in a bowl means you can miss some if you don’t break the yolks first, it sounds obvious, but when you are pushed for time every bit counts.

Whatever you do – stir them constantly and DON’T BURN them….and if you do burn the bottom, I have seen people carefully save the layer above the burnt eggs and transfer to another pan, there is NOTHING worse than burnt eggs all through good egg. I have never had burnt eggs or porridge in my kitchen….fingers crossed!

Prevent burnt eggs by constant stirring once it reaches the stage where the eggs are starting to cook. One person must be on this and you can use them on the porridge at this stage too.

BACON:

Bacon bits are cheaper – but they are not as good or as easy to cook.

Streaky bacon is good – but is usually thinner and smaller – there fore it doesn’t give you as much per person in terms of cost vs. weight.

Bacon that is cheap – usually is mostly fat, and if you don’t cook it well, the fat doesn’t do anything but stay sinuey and acts like elastic, which can be REALLY unpleasant.

Once it is all laid out on trays, start cooking but keep an eye on it. If your ovens are good they can cook in a very short time. Rotating them, taking them out, taking the excess oil off with paper towels and then putting them onto a warming tray adding each batch as you go, is a good way to do it.

I have been in a kitchen in Ireland where there were only two of us, 80 people eating and the ovens did NOT want to work fast. We ended up pre-cooking batches of bacon in the microwave and then transferring it to the ovens….it was laborious but it sped up the process well.

Some people like crispy – some like not cooked…..you can try to do some of each – but it is up to you and the effort you want to go to on the day.

MUSHROOMS

You don’t need to peel them

Slice them.

ADD salt as you are cooking – unless someone has specifically said they can’t do salt. Mushrooms need salt – they just taste better.

You don’t need to add anything to the pot. Eventually the mushrooms will start sweating down and they will cook just fine. These are in little danger of burning so they require less attention than the eggs and porridge. The only thing is they are time consuming and will take a while to chop.

If you have time and the desire, frying them with garlic, salt and butter/oil is a nice touch and tastes really good. Just check allergies with the garlic.

PORRIDGE:

The only thing worse than burnt eggs….is burnt porridge in my opinion. I LOVE porridge, and if it is burnt, it makes me sad that I can’t eat what people have spent time and effort making.

Hot water to start, half a bag or bag of porridge depending on the size of the group, and then put on a mid to high heat. Keep an eye on it stirring often turning it down when it starts simmering. Constant stirring is required.

IF you think you have burnt it,  taste it and don’t scrape the bottom with the spoon.

I have seen people try to transfer the porridge out to another pot if it doesn’t taste yet, but if you scrape the bottom and continue to cook, the flavour of ‘burnt’ will diffuse all through it.

If it is well cooked and getting too thick add water and stir.  You can take it off the heat and then put it back on 15 min before service if you need space and it is cooked early.

COFFEE:

‘Technically’ not period….but in Ildhafn ,we sometimes try to have people bring coffee plungers and have them out for something a little nicer than instant during breakfast service.

(Tea is also ‘not really period’ as it came to England in the 1600’s with the Dutch Trading Company….but then many things we do aren’t period, like flushing toilets and using toothpaste and modern toothbrushes…..so….)

SERVICE:

Keep someone on the lookout for depleting tea, milk, sugar and other supplies, and have them top things up before they get too low as it just keeps things running smoothly.

We also try to have several ‘services’ of eggs and bacon, staggering it through so there is always something hot and ‘more coming’ during the Breakfast period.

Soaking bacon and other pans as you go once they are done with is really good too for the poor people coming in after you to scrape scrambled egg and porridge pots…..just saying…..

RUN SHEET:

person #1 Turn on ovens for Bacon and warming

Person #1 Boil hot water, or get it from the Urn for Porridge

Person #1 Put porridge on

Person #2 Start slicing Mushrooms and place in a pot as you go until done, cook on stove top once all sliced.

Person #3 Start cracking eggs in a bowl and piercing the yolks until done

Person #1 starts laying the bacon out on the trays

person #1 occasionally stirs porridge – continuous during prep so it does not burn. Water may need to be added occasionally.

Person #3 when there are enough eggs for the first batch, place in a wide deep pan and start cooking

Person #3 can now help with bacon or mushrooms

Person # 3 can go back to check eggs and stir when required and can keep helping other areas.

Person # 1, 2, 3 help each other where needed, and make sure porridge, eggs and bacon do not burn.

Clean up where you can in between tasks

start setting out tea, coffee, sugar, brown sugar, milk, cream, jam,  bread, butter, salt, pepper, heat mats and service cutlery, about 15 minutes before service.

LUNCH!

NOTE: When cooking I like to keep in period i.e. use ingredients and recipes that would have been around pre 1600.

This is one of the lunches I have done for Canterbury Faire over the years. It is simple and worked well. Prep time was 2-3 hours (I tend to get into the kitchen early – just in case)

MENU For Canterbury Faire – service to 120 people:

Chicken Drumsticks

Vegetarian Sausages

Honey Roast Carrots

Cheese – tasty and feta

Boiled eggs

Dressed cucumber

Salad with herbs

Un-herbed salad

Salad Dressing

Recipes:

Chicken drumsticks:

oil

salt

drumsticks

INSTRUCTIONS:

preset oven to 200 C

put oil and salt into a bowl

Take chicken drumsticks and lightly coat them in this

lay them on oven trays covered with foil /into foil trays

place in the oven and cook for 30 min

turn them over and cook for another 20 min  – or till cooked

Vegetarian sausages

fry in a pan with oil until done  (or as packet suggests)

Boiled Eggs

eggs

water

salt

Instructions:

8 dozen eggs ( one egg per person with about 10 extra)

evenly distributed over several pots

Boiling water

On stove till they boil (depends on how many eggs are in the water)

take out of hot water

leave in cold water (in a fridge if possible – if not, a chilly bin or esky works well) to cool at least half an hour before serving

ROAST CARROTS with honey and dill:

carrots – 50gm per person

rosemary

oil

salt

honey

dill

INSTRUCTIONS:

pre heat oven to 200 C

cut carrots half lengh wise if long, if not leave whole

slice the carrots diagonally into 1 ½ inch thick slices

Toss in a bowl with the oil, salt and rosemary

put in foil tins or trays and drizzle honey over

roast for 20 minutes – or until slightly firm to the bite

take out and toss with dill

Salad (gf/v/df)

mixed leaves

(any herbs will do)

dill

parsley

rosemary

basil

mint

DRESSING:

oil

white wine vinegar

salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

chop herbs  (this may take a while depending on the herbs)

combine with salad leaves (this may take a while if you are using un-prepared lettuce leaves)

mix oil, white wine vinegar and salt for the dressing

DRESSED CUCUMBER : (gf/v/df)

cucumbers

salt

basil

white wine vinegar

oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

peal cucumbers (if pushed for time you don’t have to…)

chop cucumbers in half

cut cucumbers into long slices

chop basil

put cucumber in a bowl and mix with the salt

add vinegar, basil, pepper and oil to taste

CHEESE:

cut feta and tasty cheese into cubes

BREAD:

scottish bapts / Bread rolls

pull apart gluten free bread

Apples – cut into quarters and put in water

Oranges – cut into quarters and put in water

RUN SHEET

Scottish bapts – take out wed morning set on trays to defrost (par baked)

2 hour prep:  11 am – 1.00pm

–  Pre heat oven for chicken and Carrots to 200 C

–  Chop carrots for roasting

–  Cover chicken in oil and salt and place in roasting pan – place in oven when heated.

–  Place water in pans for eggs, put eggs in pans – make sure the water covers them, cook for half an hour         once boiling, take out of water and cool in cold water at least half an hour before service.

–  Toss carrots in oil, salt and rosemary and place in roasting pans, drizzle honey over – place in oven when         heated

–  Place bapts in the oven (part baked)

–  Cut cucumbers

–  Turn chicken drumsticks

–  Salt cucumbers and add basil, white wine vinegar and oil to taste

–  Chop herbs for salad

–  Place chopped herbs in leaf salad and mix

–  Combine oil, white wine vinegar and salt

–  Cut cheese into cubes

–  Chicken – if done put in the warmers, check the eggs.

12.30

–  Cut the apples and oranges,

–   Fry sausages

–  Cool eggs

Note:

once water is boiled for the eggs time for 30 min, take out once done, put in cold water

Equipment:

4 Pots for 8 dozen eggs

slotted spoon

Chopping board and knife for carrots

bowl to toss carrots in

tin trays or trays for carrots

Bowl for oil, salt and chicken

tin trays or trays for carrots

pan and fish slice for vegetarian sasauges

Chopping board and knife for cucumbers and basil

bowl for cucumbers

Chopping board and knife for cheese

chopping board and knife for parsley and dill

bowl for mixing salad

jug for oil, white wine vinegar and salt

GREAT NORTHERN WAR LUNCH – service to 200/250 depending:

This works well for a lunch with a big number of people as products like Olives and Pickled onions can be bulk bought.

We found that in 2013 the Populous at Sunday’s allotment of meat on the Saturday lunch…..so we adjusted the quantities for 2014. The salad products were also well received in 2013, which was an area that not much emphasis was placed in other years.

I make as much of the food Vegetarian and Gluten Free friendly as possible, especially the soup.

Using the left over soup from the Friday night soup kitchen and the feast left overs on the Sat/Mon lunch also works well, especially in terms of meat shortages…. I have found that Australians seem to eat a lot of meat…

If you are cooking all the lunches over the weekend, starting soups that need a lot of chopping (ie the leek and onion soup) the day before and putting it to boil during the service/clean up is a great idea, and it means that half your work is done for you for the next day.

Menu

Deli Ham, silverside, Chicken, Salami

Dressed Cucumber

Herbed Salad

Un-herbed salad

Dressing

Boiled eggs

Chopped Carrots

Olives

Pickled onions

Gerkins

Soup (leek and onion but could easily be mushroom soup)

Cheese – tasty

Bread rolls

Butter

Apples

Mandarins

Biscuits

Nuts

RECIPIES: 

HERBED SALAD (gf/v/df)

mixed leaves

(any herbs will do)

dill

parsley

rosemary

basil

mint

DRESSING:

oil

white wine vinegar

salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

chop herbs  (this may take a while depending on the herbs)

combine with salad leaves (this may take a while if you are using un-prepared lettuce leaves)

mix oil, white wine vinegar and salt for the dressing

DRESSED CUCUMBER :

cucumbers

salt

basil

white wine vinegar

oil

INSTRUCTIONS:

peal cucumbers (if pushed for time you don’t have to…)

chop cucumbers in half

cut cucumbers into long slices

chop basil

put cucumber in a bowl and mix with the salt

add vinegar, basil, pepper and oil to taste

Carrot sticks (gf/v/df) – 50gm carrot per person

cut carrots finger length

cut carrots into widths half finger width

Boiled eggs (gf/v/df) – one per person

eggs

water

salt

Instructions:

(one egg per person with about 10 extra)

evenly distributed over several pots

Boiling water

On stove till they boil (depends on how many eggs are in the water)

take out of hot water

leave in cold water (in a fridge if possible – if not, a chilly bin or esky works well) to cool at least half an hour before serving

pickles (gf/v/df) – two / three industrial jars for 200 people

cut into widths quarter finger width

Pickled Onions (gf/v/df) – 6 small jars for 200 people

cut in half or quaters

Bread  – rolls (1.5 per person works well)

Bread – gluten free (1.5 per person)

cheese (3 kg for 200 people)

leek and onion soup – (v/gf)

onions

leeks

 verjuice
 olive oil
 pepper
 cinnamon
 saffron
 Rosemary
 Almond milk  (the recipe says make your own almond milk, but carton almond milk works just as well)
Onion and Leek Soup  –  20 people
2kg onions
6 leeks
1 cup verjuice
4 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp pepper
2 tbsp cinnamon
.5g saffron
Rosemary
Almond milk (4c almonds, 8cup water)
Chop leek and onion and put in a pot with enough water to cover, boil until cooked.
Drain and put through food processor until fairly fine. (if you don’t have a food processor – chop fine to begin, it works with slightly chunky onions and leeks)
Sautee lightly with  olive oil, pepper and cinnamon (in large quantaties – doing this in batches in woks or on the bbq works well)
tinge 1lt of water with saffron and add to onions and leeks with Verjuice and rosemary – cook until almost done
Add almond milk and cook until almost ready to serve
Mix through beaten eggs and serve (with grated cheese)
NOTE: the cheese and beaten eggs don’t also need to be added if you are pushed for time or can’t afford the ingredients

apples (one per person)

Mandarins (one per person)

mixed nuts (2kg for 200 people)

Dessert:

Fruit cake (one piece per person – so 6 pre made store bought cakes per 200 people)

Gluten free biscuits (2 per person)

Biscuits (20 per pack – woolworths brand gingernut and arrowroot – 2 per person)

RUN SHEET:

As you don’t know at G.N.W. how many people you have in the Kitchen to help, Starting 3 hours before service is advised.

3 people and head cook (to fill in gaps and make sure it is all working) 5 people would be a dream!

Chop leaks (person one)

Chop onions (person two)

place leaks and onions in  a pot and boil

Place water in pans for eggs, put eggs in pans – make sure the water covers    them, cook for half an hour once boiling.      (person three)

cut cucumbers and basil (person three)

salt cucumbers and add basil, white wine vinegar and oil to taste

Start to chop carrots (person one when leeks are done) when done plate

chop herbs for salad (person two once onions are done)

place chopped herbs in leaf salad and mix

combine oil, white wine vinegar and salt (for salad dressing)

puree/blend the leeks and onions (person one)

lightly saute the leeks and onions with cinnamon and  (person one)

cut rosemary for soup   – anyone

tinge water with saffron and add to onions and leeks with Verjuice and rosemary – cook until almost done (person one)

Add almond milk and cook until almost ready to serve (person one)

cut cheese into cubes (person three once done)

check the eggs, half an hour before service – take out, put in cold water and cool – anyone

cut some of the apples (person two once done) and place in a bowl in water

plate the meat, pickles, cheese, nuts,

bowl the mandarins, bread, whole apples

Equipment:

3 Pots for  eggs

slotted spoon

hopping board and knife for carrots

Chopping board and knife for cucumbers and basil

bowl for cucumbers

Chopping board and knife for cheese

chopping board and knife for parsley, dill, basil

bowl for mixing salad

jug for oil, white wine vinegar and salt

bowl for apples in water

plates for cheese, bread, carrots, pickles, nuts, meats

bowl for eggs, mandarins, apples

pot for soup

food processor for soup (not needed if you cut the leeks and onions fine enough)

chopping boards and knives for soup

A Tavern Feast 2015

St Johns of Jerusalem is an annual weekend event in Cluain, and the idea for the feast this year was ‘everyone has been forced into the tavern to shelter for the night whilst on Pilgrimage’…to which we used to great effect with good hearty food and some dinner theatre surrounding the theme.

The meal plan is below including the special food and wine presented to the head table where our B and B resided. In true Medieval style they could decide who to share their favour with, by allowing them to partake in the extra fare.

We had 36 adults and a 4 children so the portions were worked out around this – counting each of the kids as half an adult.

MENU: All food is Period to 13-15thC England, France and Spain. (Perfect for anyone walking the Compostella and calling in at a tavern……)

Bread  – 7 loaves (Vienna and brown 5 seed cob)

Herb butter  (one block)

Roast Chickens with egg and grape stuffing.

(180 gm pp) 5 number 14 chickens

Salt, oil, pepper, grapes, eggs, cloves, ginger, saffron, parsley, cinnamon.

(Boiled grape stuffed eggs for Vegetarian)

Beef stew  (with currants and onion)

150gm boneless pp – 4.2kg

Currants, onion, cinnamon, parsley, red wine vinegar, beef stock, oil, saffron, salt

Mushroom and cheese pies (one gluten free)

7 pies –5kg of mushrooms,

tasty and mozzarella cheese, ginger, salt, pepper, pastry

Cooked spinach (with oil, salt, pepper, cinnamon, mace, sugar)

A bunch per 4 people – 7 bunches

Cabbage (fried with butter, salt and pepper, cinnamon and nutmeg)

One cabbage

Roast carrots (with honey, salt, oil and dill)

50gm of carrot pp (1.5 kg)

Peas (with Ginger and honey and mint)

30gm of peas pp (1kg)

Salad with herbs

(mesculin, sage, spinach, watercress, mint, rocket)

Honey sage wine high table

One carton of white wine, sage, honey

Dessert:

Poached Pears in Wine

33 pears

1 carton of red wine, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves

Ribena version for kids and Nadia

2 bottles Cream with rose water

Service :

will need platters, serving utensils, bowls, box of spices etc, cleaning box, table cloths, knives

Make day before:

Wine

pies to cook as space in ovens the next day will be hard. They can re-heat and then come out after everything else.

Pears (marinating)

SERVICE:

Bread and butter already on tables

Chickens served on platters with salad surrounding it.

3 Bowls of stew. One on high table and the other two passed down the two tables (not enough serving bowls for any more)

3 Bowls of peas, 3 bowls of carrots, 3 bowls of cabbage and 3 bowl of spinach same as above

Pies served in dishes to tables

Egg dish and separate salad for Nadia

Cheese and wine for high table

RECIPES:

ROAST CARROTS with honey and dill:

carrots – 50gm per person

rosemary

oil

salt

honey

dill

INSTRUCTIONS:

pre heat oven to 200 C

cut carrots half lengh wise if long, if not leave whole

slice the carrots diagonally into 1 ½ inch thick slices

Toss in a bowl with the oil, salt and rosemary

put in foil tins or trays and drizzle honey over

roast for 20 minutes – or until slightly firm to the bite

take out and toss with dill

Salad (gf/v/df)

mixed leaves

(any herbs will do)

dill

parsley

rosemary

basil

mint

DRESSING:

oil

white wine vinegar

salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

chop herbs  (this may take a while depending on the herbs)

combine with salad leaves (this may take a while if you are using un-prepared lettuce leaves)

mix oil, white wine vinegar and salt for the dressing

Chicken:

GODE COOKERY TRANSLATION:

Capon or goose stuffed. Take Parsley, & Swine’s grease, or Suet of a sheep, & parboil them together till they are tender; then take hard yolks of Eggs, & chop for-with; cast thereto Powder Pepper, Ginger, Cinnamon, Saffron, & Salt, & grapes in time of year, & cloves enough; & for default of grapes, Onions, first well boiled, & afterward all chopped, & so stuff him & roast him, and serve him forth. And if you desire, take a little pork cooked, & all to chop it small among that other; for it will be better, & namely for the Capon.

chop for-with – chop and add.
grapes in time of year – grapes in season.
all to chop it small among that other – mince the pork and mix with the other ingredients.

MODERN RECIPE:

1 bunch parsley, chopped

½ cup small seedless grapes

1 large onion, chopped

½ tsp. salt

¼ tsp. each pepper, ginger, cloves, & cinnamon

1/8 tsp. saffron

4 hard boiled egg yolks, chopped

1/3 lb. pork roast

1 tbs. oil

5 chickens

6 bunches parsley

4 cups grapes

30 eggs

(no pork)

Chop the pork into small pieces; broil or boil until done. (If boiling, drain well but reserve broth for later use.) Mince or grind meat after it has cooled. Parboil the parsley in water and the oil until soft; drain well. (If omitting the grapes from the stuffing, add the onion with the parsley and boil together.) Add meat, eggs, and spices, mixing thoroughly. Stuff a capon, a chicken, a small goose, or a game hen with this mixture and bake at 375° F for 45 minutes, or until done a golden brown. Serves 2-4.

Peas:

Boil peas in the water with sliced ginger

Mix mint and honey through when served.

Place ginger in dish with peas

Mushroom Pasty

PERIOD: France, 14th century | SOURCE: Le Ménagier de Paris | CLASS: Authentic

DESCRIPTION: A mushroom and cheese pie

ORIGINAL RECIPE :

Mushrooms of one night be the best and they be little and red within and closed at the top; and they must be peeled and then washed in hot water and parboiled and if you wish to put them in a pasty add oil, cheese and spice powder.

– Power, Eileen. The Goodman of Paris (Le Ménagier de Paris). A Treatise on Moral and Domestic Economy by A Citizen of Paris (c. 1395). New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1928.

MODERN RECIPE:

1-1 1/2 lbs. whole button or sliced mushrooms

2 tbs. olive oil

1/2 cup grated or shredded cheese

1/2 tsp. each salt and ginger

1/4 tsp. pepper

one 9″ pie shell (lid optional)

Parboil or sauté the mushrooms; drain. Add oil, cheese, and spices. Mix well. Place in pie shell, add lid if desired, and bake at 350° F for 35-40 minutes, or until pastry is a golden brown.

While I prefer using grated parmesan or a combination of parmesan & cheddar cheese, feel free to use any variety of cheese or combination that suits you. Finer cheeses, such as brie, also work quite well, and brie itself is very appropriate for a recipe of French origin. Some other period cheeses include Farmers and Mozzarella.

This is an absolutely delicious pie and is one of my favorites!

Stwed Beeff

Beef stew with onions and currants.
(Harleian MS 4016 – English, 15th century)

Take faire ribbes of ffresh beef, and (if thou wilt) roste hit til hit be nygh ynowe; then put hit in a faire possenet; caste þerto parcely and onyons mynced, reysons of corauns, powder peper, canel, clowes, saundres, safferon, and salt; then cast thereto wyn and a littul vynegre; sette a lyd on þe potte and lete hit boile sokingly on a faire charcole til hit be ynogh; þen lay the fflessh in disshes, and the sirippe thereuppon, and serve it forth.

around 500g good quality stewing beef
2 large onions
handful of fresh parsley, chopped
handful of currants
1/2 tsp each of pepper, cloves, sandalwood
1 tsp cinnamon
pinch of saffron
300-500ml red wine
4 tblsp red wine vinegar
200 ml beef stock
olive oil

Cube beef and fry in a little olive oil until browned and partly cooked. Add onions and parsley, currants, spices, wine, vinegar and beef stock. Simmer over a low heat until the meat is cooked and tender (around 1 hour). Ajust seasoning (esp. salt and vinegar) before serving; I like this with a faint vinegary tang to complement the fruit.

Fried Cabbage

One cabbage

Salt, pepper, nutmeg, cinnamon, fried in butter

DESSERT:

Pears:

30 pears, cored, boil in red wine with spices

Boil in Ribena for the kids (and Nadia)

Cream: beat with rose water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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